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Surgery Options

Presbyopia Lens Replacement Surgery

Costs


Medicare and most private insurance plans generally do not cover the costs of lens replacement surgery for presbyopia, but you should check with your insurance provider to find out what coverage, if any, may apply.

When you evaluate the costs of presbyopia correction, keep in mind that presbyopia lens replacement surgery can not only save you the costs of wearing glasses or contact lenses-it will also prevent you from developing cataracts later in life, which means you will never have the diminished vision and diminished quality of life that cataracts can cause and you will never incur the costs of cataract surgery.

Even without insurance coverage, there are still ways you may be able to reduce and manage the cost of treatment and there are options for lens replacement payment plans. Learn more below.

Average costs of lens replacement for presbyopia

    Specialized lenses-multifocal or accommodative-typically cost more than monovision with standard or toric IOLs.

    The following amounts are approximate guidelines only, based on the most commonly reported fees in the U.S. in 2009:

    • All lens types range from $1,500 to $5,000 per eye
    • Multifocal or accommodative lenses average $4,227 per eye
    • Standard or astigmatism-correcting toric lenses average $3,365 per eye

    Remember that the costs of lens replacement are always provided for each eye individually. Plans and prices vary, so check with your doctor and insurance provider to see which types of lenses are covered and at what costs.

    Prices are based on Market Scope survey data and represent national averages. Prices may vary significantly in your area. ASCRS does not suggest that the price ranges or averages should prevail for any given service or product. The information is provided only as a means to help patients consider the selection of vision management options.

Flexible spending accounts

    If the costs of lens replacement for presbyopia are not covered by your insurance, look into any flexible spending accounts or "cafeteria" plans offered by your employer. These accounts let you use pretax dollars for medical expenses, so your money goes farther.

Lens replacement payment plans

    Many ophthalmologists also offer you the option of paying for your surgery over time. If the idea of financing your surgery appeals to you, ask your doctor what type of lens replacement payment plans he or she offers.

If you’re considering presbyopia lens replacement surgery, learn more about what to expect before and during surgery.

Glossary

Not sure what a particular term means? Click on words in bold to pull up the glossary tab.

FAQ

Why do specialized intraocular lenses cost more than standard intraocular lenses?

    Specialized or premium IOLs (like multifocal, toric and accommodative lenses) are more complex and advanced than standard monofocal lenses. Moreover, your surgeon must take additional time examining you and perform added tests and calculations to implant premium lenses. Although they cost more, premium lenses can often provide greater benefits, too, including freedom from the expenses and hassles of glasses or contact lenses.

Glossary Entries

Accommodative lens
A type of intraocular lens (artificial lens implanted in the eye in place of or in front of the natural lens to improve focus and correct vision problems). Has a fixed focal point but physically changes shape inside the eye in response to eye muscle movements to adjust for clear vision at near, intermediate or far distances.

Astigmatism
Common vision problem and type of refractive error. Caused by either irregularity in the curvature of the cornea or the lens of the eye. People with astigmatism generally have difficulty seeing fine details at all distances. Treated with corrective lenses, laser vision correction or toric IOLs.

Cafeteria plans
Service offerings from a doctor's office that enable patients to select a number of services from a list. For example, the basic fee might include only an initial procedure and the cafeteria plan would allow patients to select additional follow-up visits, enhancements or touch-up procedures as part of their entire service package.

Cataract
Clouding of the eye's lens that blocks passage of light to the retina, resulting in impaired vision. Often a result of normal aging, cataracts form when protein clumps cloud areas of the eye's lens. As the cataract progresses, vision worsens and often requires surgical replacement of the damaged lens with an artificial one.

Monofocal (or "standard") intraocular lens
Type of intraocular lens (artificial lens implanted in the eye in place of or in front of the natural lens to improve focus and correct vision problems) designed to provide clear vision at one fixed focal point (usually for clear distance vision).

Monovision
Vision correction that eliminates need for bifocals or reading glasses by correcting one eye for clear distance vision and the other for clear up-close vision. The brain combines the two images to create clear vision at all distances.

Multifocal intraocular lens
Type of intraocular lens (artificial lens implanted in the eye in place of or in front of the natural lens to improve focus and correct vision problems) designed to include corrections for near, intermediate and distance vision in the same lens.

Presbyopia
Also called age-related focus dysfunction. Common vision problem that develops naturally over time. Characterized by loss of the eye's ability to focus at close distances or on fine details. Treated with reading glasses, contact lenses, presbyopia laser vision correction (also called LASIK monovision) or presbyopia lens replacement surgery.

Toric lens
Type of intraocular lens (artificial lens implanted in the eye in place of or in front of the natural lens to improve focus and correct vision problems) designed to correct moderate to severe astigmatism.

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